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    5 Easy Backpacking Breakfasts (Besides Oatmeal)

    5 Easy Backpacking Breakfasts (Besides Oatmeal)

    Written by Becky Wood

    My favorite part of backpacking isn’t the hiking, the summit, or even the stars: it’s mornings at camp. 

    It’s waking up to a jaw-droppingly beautiful view that I reached on my own two feet and savoring the sunrise, titanium spork in my hand and a giant smile on my face. 

    I’m as picky about my breakfasts as I am about my tent views. The classic backpacker’s breakfast is instant oatmeal, but you can only eat so much of that before you’re sick of it. 

    That’s why I’ve spent the past few years trail-testing other easy, delicious backpacking breakfasts. The best meals share three qualities: 

    • Easy to pack: big on flavor, low on weight
    • Easy to prep: just add water (and an epic view) 
    • Easy to eat: good for my taste buds, but also for my body.

    With those in mind, here are my top 5 backpacking breakfasts for your next adventure.


    1. Savory Switchback Scramble 

    Craving a breakfast that’s savory, not sweet? This is an egg-cellent choice. I call it the Switchback Scramble because the first time I tried it, it had me sprinting up steep Sierra switchbacks like a mountain goat. 

    Ingredients: 

    4 TBSP OvaEasy egg crystals 

    6 TBSP water 

    1 pouch Summit Savory Chicken, made according to package

    (optional) mini hot sauce packet 

    (optional) tortilla or spinach wrap 

    Mix all ingredients together in the meal pouch. (Yup, it’s that easy.) Stuff it in a tortilla or spinach wrap for a backcountry breakfast burrito!

    You could also just eat dinner for breakfast —in the backcountry, there’s no one to judge— but the eggs make it feel more like a morning meal. Makes enough for two hungry hikers.

    Palisade pineapple mango paleo gluten free breakfast meal in snow

    1. Palisade Pineapple Mango Bowl

    With views this sweet, who needs added sugar?

    The Palisade Pineapple Mango Bowl is just as nourishing and comforting as a hot bowl of oatmeal, but with a sexy tropical twist. Pecans and walnuts add a pleasant crunch often lacking from instant oatmeal, while the natural sweetness of freeze-dried pineapple and mango tickle my tastebuds.

    The best part? No sugar crash en route to the summit.

     

    1. DIY Sunrise Smoothie 

    On sultry summer mornings that have you shedding layers before you even unzip your tent, a warm meal isn’t always appetizing. Enter the backcountry smoothie, full of healthy fats to keep you fueled all morning.

    Ingredients: 

    3 TBSP coconut milk powder 

    1 TBSP greens powder 

    1 TBSP collagen peptides
    1 TBSP flax or chia seeds
    1 tsp cinnamon

    1 tsp cacao 

    (optional) handful Air Dried Tropical Fruit Mix for texture 

    Add 1-2 cups of water to taste and shake to mix.

    I like to pre-mix a couple servings of smoothie mix at home and bring them on the trail in individual quart-sized Ziplocks. When I’m ready to eat, I’ll mix the packet with water in an empty Gatorade bottle to sip on the go. 

    Some of my thru-hiker friends like to cold soak their morning smoothie overnight so it’s ready to go as soon as they are. Just wake and shake! They’ll knock out the first few miles as soon as they wake up, then stop somewhere scenic for a full breakfast down the trail.

    Smoothies are also great if tummy troubles or altitude sickness start affecting your appetite. Even when I’m queasy at elevation and don’t want to eat, I can almost always take a few sips of smoothie to keep my energy up. 

    Butte cacao banana breakfast meal in nature

     

    1. Butte Cacao Banana Bowl

    If I’m being honest, chocolate is my secret 11th essential on hiking trips. Unfortunately, too much of it will leave me trudging down the trail. The Butte Cacao Banana bowl gives me my chocolate fix via tasty cacao nibs without the side effects of giant Snickers bars. (Though I still bring a small Snickers for the summit...it’s about balance.)

    Plus, this breakfast packs a whopping 15g of dietary fiber — significantly more than typical processed, preservative-heavy backpacking meals that can leave you feeling blocked. (Paleo porridge = better poops in the backcountry. There, I said it.)

    cliffside coconut berry paleo gluten free meal to go hiking camping next to cliff

     

    1. Cliffside Coconut Berry 

    Crawling out of my cozy sleeping bag in the morning is always a struggle, no matter how gorgeous the view. But when there’s coffee and Cliffside Coconut Berry waiting on the other side, I unzip my bag a little faster. 

    After a few days of eating mostly packaged foods, the strawberries and blueberries add a welcome taste of fresh fruit. They’re freeze-dried so they taste freshly picked. 

    The best part of this meal, though, is the 13g of protein. That’s more than the protein in 4 slices of bacon, but with flaxseed to give you more long-lasting fuel. 

    When you’re hiking many miles a day with a heavy pack, your muscles crave protein to rebuild. Starting the day with a protein-packed meal makes my muscles happier, which makes my time on the trail much happier, too.
    --- 

    With breakfasts like these, it’s easy to pack light and eat right in the backcountry. I’ll be taking all of these meals with me on my 220-mile thru-hike of the John Muir Trail this summer, where I know they’ll pair well with a cup of coffee and breathtaking alpine views. 

    What’s for breakfast on your next backpacking trip? We’d love to hear your favorites. 

    ---


    Becky Wood is a freelance writer, road tripper, and backpacker roaming the American West with her adventure pup, Juno. Follow their adventures on Instagram at @bonjourbecky and at bonjourbecky.com

    We're Ready To Kill Him!

    We're Ready To Kill Him!-Wild Zora
    Hear Christmas tales from the Wild Zora family! Zora's fishy Christmas in Czech, Lorenzo's all-night Mexican Christmas in California and Lalita's childhood Thai Christmas will give you an insight into our team as well as traditions from around the world.  Cheers to a great 2018 and on to an even better 2019!

    Read more

    Roadtrip? Take Us Along.

    Roadtrip? Take Us Along.-Wild Zora

     When it comes to food, road trips can be a real ordeal. The choices are not appealing: gas station convenience store with its pre-packaged "food stuffs" or fast food joints, with their signature off-putting smell of overused deep fryers.  Preparing healthy snacks for a road trip may seem like one chore too many. Now what?

    Don't despair. Here are a few tips for quick and easy healthy snacks:

    Fruit & Vegetables

    Aim for fruits that keep well and don't make a big mess. 

    Fruit Healthy  Road Trip Snack

    • Bananas: buy them on the under-ripe side. Consider the weather: they will become mushy if left in a hot, sunny car.
    • Apples: go with smaller ones, so you can eat them quickly.  Wash and dry them well. Unless you travel with small children, there is no need to cut them up beforehand - exposure to oxygen will cause loss of vitamin C. 
    • Berries:  blueberries or blackberries are less delicate than raspberries and strawberries, so they travel better. Wash them well and let them dry; extra moisture can cause them to get moldy quickly. Pick out any soft, overripe berries before the trip.
    • Mandarin Oranges:  when in season, they make a good little snack with its own fully biodegradable packaging
    • Dried Fruit:  it keeps well and doesn't take up a lot of space, but it is high in sugar, so eat it only small amounts
    • Salad in a jar: It's great if you have time to pull over and eat. The internet is teeming with ideas, or you can create your own recipe. To speed up the prep time, go with baby greens and grape tomatoes. To make your salad more satisfying, top it with some good protein- have you tried Wild Zora? Simply unpack your favorite bar, break into pieces and toss it in your salad. Note that Wild Zora bars contain no preservatives and must be refrigerated after opening.
    • Celery or Carrot Sticks: great snacking staples that keep well and aren't too messy to eat. To take full advantage of their nutritional content, those veggies should be eaten with some fat (vitamins A, D, E, K only dissolve in fat). 

    Note: if you are traveling to another state, check their policies regarding out-of-state produce. The best place to look is the state Department of Agriculture website.

     

    Nuts & Seeds

    Nuts and seeds, healthy  snack ideas

    You can often buy nuts and seeds snack mixes at gas stations. The problem is, they are often overly salty. Although nuts, peanuts, and seeds pack a hefty dose of calories, they tend to leave you unsatisfied. Plus, tree nuts and peanuts are major allergens and seeds are often processed in the facilities that process those two "offenders" as well, so cross-contamination can happen. The last thing you need on your trip is an allergy attack!

    Another issue with this food group: they are oily and if not stored properly, they will eventually go bad.  Rancid nuts and seeds can give you indigestion.

    All that aside, a small amount of nut or seed mix can add a nice crunch to your snack.  Their fat content will be a nice complement to your veggies.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Source: http://healthinpics.blogspot.com/2014/04/nut-chart-comparing-calories-fat-carbs.html

     

    Protein Snacks 

    •  Cheese - go for natural types, not the cheese-like substance pressed into slices. Cheese can be a tasty snack, but it doesn't do well in warm areas. If you are traveling in a bigger group, remember many kinds of cheese have a rather strong aroma. 
    • Lunch Meat - if you are looking for healthy snacks, you might want to avoid this one. Even natural lunch meats are heavily processed.  Lunch meat can go bad, so you need to think about refrigeration; a small cooler will be sufficient.
    • Jerky - although jerky is a popular snack that packs a healthy dose of protein, you really need to read the labels carefully. Jerky often contains added sugar, nitrites, and nitrates. 
    • Hard-boiled Egg - if you have time to prepare, a boiled egg is a great protein source. It's best if you can keep it refrigerated. Also, be mindful of the rather strong aroma eggs can produce.
    • Protein Bars - they are readily convenient and easy to carry.  Most of them don't require refrigeration.  We put together a handy chart comparing major natural protein snack bars. Click here for more details. Main things to watch for: added sugar (can cause a sugar spike and a crash, rather than giving you sustained energy), preservatives (including lactic acid starter culture, which gives the bar a sour taste) and allergens - including potential traces of allergens.  Choose your protein sources carefully. If you are lactose-intolerant, avoid whey protein. If you are trying to avoid GMOs, we advise staying away from snacks that contain soy protein, since most of it comes from GMO soy. 
    • Wild Zora Meat & Veggie Bars - a small bar that packs a punch - organic veggies, pasture-raised meat, touch of dried fruit and delicious spice blends. The package is small enough to fit in your glove compartment or purse. It's shelf stable, so you don't have to refrigerate it. With seven flavors, AIP, Whole30, and Paleo certified options, it's easy for everyone to find their favorite.  Because we pack the bars in our own facility and we never process any nuts or peanuts, the Wild Zora bars are safe even for people with severe allergies.

       

       

       How to pack it all?

      If you don't want to bring a cooler, try to find a basket or a box.  You can keep your snacks organized and you will see where everything is. Plus, if you are bringing fruit, it's less likely to get squashed and bruised.

      Here is one idea:

      Source: https://wholefully.com/44-healthy-road-trip-snack-ideas/

      When traveling with children, it's a good idea to create separate snack boxes for each child to avoid unnecessary drama and fights.  You can use kids' school lunchboxes, decorated paper bags or small canvas bags.  I love the idea of putting the snacks in the back seat organizer, so the kiddos can get them by themselves.

      Source: http://kidtokid.com/roadtrip-helper/

      Of course, there are snacks that require no fussy packing:

       

      Let us know in comments what's your go-to road trip snack.  We would love to hear your ideas!      

      Have a safe and fun trip!        

             

      For more information, special discounts and $6 off your next order, sign up for our newsletter!

       

       

       

      5 Reasons to travel with Wild Zora

      5 Reasons to travel with Wild Zora

      Why do you like Wild Zora?

      We asked and you answered. The number 1 reason people like Wild Zora bars is for travel and those times in-between meals when they can't find or have time for some REAL FOOD.

      Here are the top 5 reasons why you need Wild Zora on your next trip.

      1. Real Food

      Oftentimes when traveling,  you will find yourself in a nutritional void known as the Food Desert. Access to healthy food is limited or non-existent.  You feel stuck, trying to choose a lesser evil.   Luckily, that Wild Zora in your bag provides balanced nutrition with less sugar, grains, and starch than conventional snacks.  With organic fruits and veggies and responsibly raised meats, Wild Zora has your back. 

      2. Handy

      What better way to get some healthy sustenance than with easy-to-handle meat and veggie bars made from minimally processed meat, mixed with organic veggies and no artificial ingredients?  The bars are not sticky and although they resemble jerky, they are tender and easy to chew.  You can take a Wild Zora bar with you and enjoy only the highest quality food ingredients on-the-go wherever you go.

       

      3. No Chemicals or Allergens

      Wild Zora contains NO chemical preservatives or ingredients that you can't pronounce.  We also have NO added sugar or processed sweeteners, hormones or antibiotics, gluten, nuts/peanuts/tree-nuts, soy, MSG, or milk (except for our Parmesan Beef flavor). On top of that, we provide flavors that have NO nightshades and are AIP-friendly (our Lamb flavor and soon, the new Apple Pork).  That's a lot of NOs that we're awfully proud of. 

       

       4. Energy

      Wild Zora bars use only low Glycemic Index carbohydrates such as healthy, high-fiber, organic fruits and vegetables which provide you with longer lasting energy without the sugar high and inevitable crash. This comes in very handy while traveling, wouldn't you say?

       

      5.Tasty!

      Oh, and did we mention that Wild Zora Meat & Veggie bars are extremely tasty? That's the most important part! With five globally inspired flavors, it's hard to pick a favorite.


      So there you have it. The top 5 reasons why Wild Zora is your new favorite travel buddy.  Which one will accompany you on your next adventure?

       

       

       

       Let's keep in touch! Sign up for our newsletter and get $6 off your next order, plus regular special deals.

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