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    Apple Pork

    Why Parsley, Sage, Rosemary & Thyme?

    Why Parsley, Sage, Rosemary & Thyme?-Wild Zora

    Admit it. You can't just say "parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme", you have to sing it!  

    But have you actually used this famous herb combo in your cooking?  We have.  It's one of the things that makes our new Apple Pork bar so tasty.

     

    When we set out to create the new flavor, we faced several challenges.  We knew we wanted to create a snack that's AIP compliant and allium-free, meaning it had no onions or garlic.  It's important to us to accommodate our friends with food sensitivities.  But if you ever tried to cook without onions and garlic, you know that the resulting dish isn't often bursting with flavor.  Even more challenging: the new flavor was going to be made with pork.  Onions and garlic are natural companions of pork meat and without them, it tastes bland.  We are Wild Zora, not Bland Zora!  We experimented with a variety of seasonings, but in the end decided to go with the herb combo immortalized in Scarborough Fair: parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme.

     

    Why these four?

    Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme have been used for centuries both as remedies and as seasoning. 

    Although we associate the four herbs with the "Scarborough Fair", the herby refrain is a relatively new addition to the old song; it's believed to originate in the 19th century. 

    It's entirely possible that the names of herbs simply made it into the song because they sound nice.  But the herbs also carry symbolic meaning.  The language of flowers was highly popular in the 19th century; it was a way to send cryptic messages through flower arrangement.  Could parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme serve as a way to send a secret message to the "true love of mine"?

     

    Meaning of Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme

      

    That's all very interesting, but what does it have to with you?  You can try to send a bouquet to your ex and hope she is well versed in Victorian ways.  Maybe she will let go of her bitter feelings, find strength and wisdom to remember the love you shared, and have the courage to be happy with you again.  Or not.  In that case, you can use the herbs for cooking.

    They taste great together

    Don't take our word for it, try it for yourself.  Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme add fresh herby flavor to any dish.  Try it in stews, or with poultry.  Stuff your Thanksgiving turkey with a big bunch of those flavorful herbs.  Here is an everyday recipe using these wonderful herbs:

     

    We found that parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme taste wonderful with pork.  Next time you are making pork roast or pork chops, try this flavorful foursome.   Or, order some Apple Pork Wild Zora bars today!

     

     They are good for you

    Like many culinary herbs, parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme have strong medicinal properties. 

     

    Parsley

    This humble herb often used only as garnish and discarded is a nutritional powerhouse. Parsley is rich in vitamins A, K, B, and C; in fact, it contains more vitamin C than oranges.  It's also a great source of calcium and iron.  To boost your immune system, add fresh chopped parsley on top of your favorite savory dishes.  It's a  mild diuretic, so it supports kidney health.  Like many green plants, it's rich in chlorophyl which helps fight off bad breath.  If you enjoy foods heavily seasoned with garlic, try chewing a few sprigs of fresh parsley after the meal to combat garlic breath. 

    It's a mild diuretic, so it supports kidney health.  Like many green plants, it's rich in chlorophyll which helps fight off bad breath.  If you enjoy foods heavily seasoned with garlic, try chewing a few sprigs of fresh parsley after the meal to combat garlic breath. 

    Parsley is readily available in most grocery stores, but it's very easy to grow.  It's best to start it from seed since the plant has deep roots that might make transplanting difficult.  It grows well in containers and requires well-drained soil.

     

    Sage

    The Latin name for sage, Salvia (Salvia Officinalis), is related to the word salvus, which means "healthy", or salvare, "to save".  It has been used for centuries to ease indigestion from heavy meals.  Sage has many benefits and deserves to be a regular part of your diet.

    Because of its antibacterial properties, sage infusion makes a wonderful mouthwash or face wash, if you struggle with acne.  It's also a great gargle for a sore throat.

    Many people are hesitant to use sage as a culinary herb because of its strong, somewhat medicinal taste.  It works well paired with other herbs - in our Scarborough Fair combo, the bitterness of sage is balanced out by the mild sweetness of parsley.  It works really well in our Apple Pork bar - it tames the sweet apple and complements the succulent pork. 

    When grown outdoors, sage forms an attractive low shrub with silvery leaves and purple blossoms.  It does well in dry,  sunny spots.  If you grow it indoors it stays fairly small and likely won't bloom.

     

    Rosemary

    Because rosemary is the main flavor in our bestselling Mediterranean Lamb bar, we wrote another blog post about its many health benefits.

    Rosemary brings bright, slightly woodsy flavor to our combination.  You will barely taste it in the Apple Pork bar, but it helps bring out the mild flavor of the all-natural pork and balances out the sweet notes of apples and cinnamon.

     

    Thyme

     Thyme has been highly regarded by herbalists for centuries.  It has been used as an antiseptic and room deodorizer.  To this day, thyme is used to help ease symptoms of respiratory illnesses; it eases coughing and fever and also alleviates headaches.  It was used to relieve asthma symptoms in medieval times.  

    As a culinary herb, thyme is indispensable.  It's used in many herb mixes, including bouquet garni, and it is a staple in Italian cuisine.  Its bright, comforting flavor goes really well with fish and seafood.  If you would like to eat more fish for its health benefits but find the fishy taste off-putting, try seasoning it with thyme and lemon.

    If you want to enjoy fresh thyme, you can grow it both outdoors and indoors.  As an outdoors plant, thyme is a beautiful addition to a rock garden. It is an easy plant to grow;  it doesn't need really rich soil and prefers dry, sunny spots.  When you grow thyme in a container, make sure you don't overwater it.

     

    Make parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme your kitchen staple.  Not only do they bring a comforting herby flavor to many dishes, they also have many health benefits.  That's why we added them to our new AIP compliant Apple Pork bar. Have you tried it yet?

     

     

     

     

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    Got Pork?

    Got Pork?

    Drumroll, please! They are here!

    The wait is over.  Today, you can start ordering the new Wild Zora pork bars.


     

    We are excited about this new addition to our family of products. We found a wonderful local pork that is not only all-natural and raised responsibly, it also tastes wonderful. We paired it with organic fruits and vegetables, herbs, and spices to bring you new snacks that are both healthy and delicious.

     

    Meet Apple Pork


    You asked, we listened.  Many of you asked us to create a new AIP compliant flavor that would also be allium-free (no onions or garlic).  We built this recipe around tried and true, traditional combinations.  Apple and pork are paired with parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme and a hint of cinnamon.  The final result is a healthy, satisfying snack with delightful, comforting flavor.  We dare you to eat just one!

    • AIP compliant
    • Paleo friendly
    • Whole30 compliant
    • Dairy free
    • Gluten free
    • Allergen-free: no peanuts, no tree nuts, no soy

     

    Meet Taco Pork


    This is not your ordinary taco meat!  We paired the succulent pork with a unique blend of rich spices, touch of lime and a lively jalapeño.  This bar will make your taste buds dance!  Keep some in your desk drawer to brighten dull days.

    • Paleo friendly
    • Whole30 compliant
    • Dairy free
    • Gluten free
    • Allergen-free: no peanuts, no tree nuts, no soy

    Which one did you order and why? Let us know in comments!

     

     

    For more information, special discounts and $6 off your next order, sign up for our newsletter!

     

    Health Benefits of Rosemary

    Health Benefits of Rosemary

    Rosemary adds its woodsy, crisp flavor to lots of popular dishes.  Today, we use rosemary mostly as a seasoning, but you can take full advantage of its health benefits by using it in a variety of ways. You can inhale its scent, clean with it or eat it.  If you need a quick rosemary snack, grab one of our Mediterranean Lamb bars.  The new Apple Pork Wild Zora bar combines rosemary with the familiar notes of parsley, sage, and thyme.

    Throughout history, rosemary was prized for its many qualities, beyond culinary use.  Ancient Greeks and Romans believed rosemary improved memory; when preparing for exams, students wore rosemary wreaths on their heads.

    In Medieval and Renaissance times, rosemary was used to ward off plague and as a deodorizer.  It was still believed to help memory and later it became the symbol of remembrance and faithfulness.  As such, it was often used at both weddings and funerals.

    Here are three easy ways rosemary can boost your health:

     

     #1. Plant it for mental clarity

    Wearing a rosemary wreath while studying might seem silly, but rosemary stimulates brain activity.  If you struggle with "foggy brain" every afternoon, try diffusing rosemary essential oil or rub a fresh rosemary sprig between your hands and inhale deeply.

    Potted Rosemary

    Rosemary is easy to grow in pots, so try keeping a small plant close to your work space.  You can grow it outside, too. In warm climates, rosemary is a perennial and will grow into a nice shrub.  If you live in an area with cold winters, you will have to replant your rosemary every year, or you might keep it in a large planter that can be moved indoors during the cold months.

     

    #2 Spray it to kill germs

    The medieval beliefs that rosemary will ward off plague were not without merit.  Rosemary has strong antimicrobial properties.  If you like to clean your home without toxic chemicals, rosemary will be your best friend.  By killing bacteria, it neutralizes odors and leaves your home smelling fresh and clean.  Use fresh rosemary, lemon and vinegar to make a simple all-purpose cleaner.

    DIY Lemon Rosemary cleaner

     Photo by Mick Telkamp

     

    #3 Eat it for your digestive health

     It's not a coincidence that rosemary is often paired with pork or  lamb.  It tastes wonderful, but more importantly, rosemary helps you digest those meats.  Because it stimulates the bile flow, rosemary is crucial to digestion of fatty foods.  Like other herbs in the mint family, it helps with indigestion, excessive bloating, and stomach cramps.

    When cooking with rosemary, try to use it fresh.  Simply strip the leaves off the woody stem (if the stem is soft, you can skip this step), and give them a rough chop before adding them to your dish. You can add whole sprigs to stews, soups and sauces, but be aware that the leaves will fall off and you might need to strain them.  If you use dried rosemary, crush it well, because the dry leaves stay hard and are not pleasant to eat.

    Try this recipe:

     

    Not in the mood for a large meal?  On the go?  Traveling?  Get the wonderful benefits of rosemary from a healthy snack, like Wild Zora Mediterranean Lamb Bar.  Don't forget about the new Apple Pork bar!  It combines pork with rosemary, parsley, sage and thyme for your taste buds and your digestive health.

    How do you like to use rosemary? Let us know in comments!

     

     

    For more information, special offers and $6 off your next order, sign up for our newsletter.

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    When to Avoid Nightshades

    When to Avoid Nightshades

     

    Nightshades, a large family of plants that include such kitchen staples as tomatoes, peppers, potatoes and paprika, are a dietary issue for some people.  Wild Zora now offers TWO delicious nightshade-free snacks.


    Nightshades are blamed for increased inflammation and a host of other medical issues, such as migraines, GI tract irritation, and arthritis flare-ups, among others. 

    The culprit is a group of alkaloids these plants contain.  One of them, called solanine, impacts metabolism of neurotransmitters which means it can negatively affect your nervous system if it builds up in your body.  That certainly sounds scary, but remember that many nightshades, like peppers and tomatoes, are full of vitamin C and other antioxidants.  Furthermore, ripe nightshade fruits and vegetables contain only traces of alkaloids and won't affect most people.

     

    Nightshade vegetables

    Source: draxe.com

    Artichokes, cherries, huckleberries, and blueberries don't belong to the nightshade family, but they also contain solanine.

    At this point, there are no major scientific studies on the effects of nightshades. Anecdotal evidence has linked nightshade consumption to rheumatoid arthritis in certain people, however, there are also many people who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, but nightshades don’t seem to have any impact on them.  It has been suggested that some people are more sensitive to alkaloids than others.

    Some can also have an allergic reaction to nightshades.  The reactions can vary from a rash to anaphylaxis.  The nightshade allergy is rather rare, so is not considered a common allergen.

     


     

    How do you find out if nightshades cause your painful arthritis flare-ups or leaky gut? 

    1. Start by keeping a food journal.  Check labels carefully and ask questions when you eat at a restaurant.  Don't forget to write down any medications, vitamins, and supplements you take.  Note all the symptoms you experience.

    2. Try to avoid nightshades for at least two weeks.  This can be tricky because nightshades are common ingredients in many foods.  Be careful with spice mixes and store-bought salad dressings, as they often contain paprika or cayenne pepper.

    3. Share your food journal with your doctor.  The information you gathered will help you both determine whether nightshades are the culprit behind your condition.

    Eating a nightshade-free diet can be challenging, but it's not impossible, and Wild Zora is here to help: our Mediterranean Lamb bar was our first nightshade-free flavor and we added a new nightshade-free Apple Pork flavor.

     

    Nightshade-free Apple Pork Wild Zora Bar

     

    Wild Zora Star

     

    Love Pork? Boy, Do We Have News For You!

    Love Pork? Boy, Do We Have News For You!

    Natural Pork

    Yes, we completed two new paleo snack recipes featuring pork and you can be among the first people to try them!

    Thanks to our Kickstarter campaign, you will have the opportunity to enjoy our new Taco Pork paleo snack bars or the AIP-friendly Apple Pork at an introductory price. Can't decide? We have a pledge level that allows you to get both!

    Visit our Kickstarter page today to get early access these new and amazing recipes!

    Which one will be your new favorite Paleo snack bar? Lively, mouthwatering Taco Pork, with jalapeño, lime, and cilantro? Or the comfort food on the go, Apple Pork, with familiar notes of parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme?

    Let us know in comments!

    Wild Zora Kickstarter